Author Topic: 1960 Austin 850 Project  (Read 27367 times)

Offline sparetimetoys

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #25 on: July 16, 2014, 08:42:07 AM »
went to a local soda blast rental place that rents the set up to blast what ever you want for $500 a day to check it out.  Turns out if I take the car to them its $100 an hour for them to blast it.  He says it takes an hour and a half or so to blast a car.  so I figure about three hours for inside and out.  I asked about all the soda causing troubles rumors and he said just pressure wash and use a leaf blower to dry it and it will be fine.
Home of Global Warmer Racing. Saving the smog one car at a time.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #26 on: July 16, 2014, 11:54:04 AM »
Posted this in the Lounge and duplicated here to show a little progress.
Did manage to get Brake and Clutch Master cylinders honed and seals replaced. Clutch MC is 59 correct bean can with removable nut on top. Tested both with no leaks and worked good.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #27 on: July 16, 2014, 11:57:16 AM »
I have one of the texas built Dustless Blasters and can strip and complete mini inside and out with the doors, boot, and bonnet, in about a day and a half.  Here is a video of me stripping a rusty bonnet.
The DB guys claim to strip a car in about an hour and a half. What media do you use?

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #28 on: July 23, 2014, 12:36:59 AM »
Finally got to blaster guy. They blasted a strip on the bottom of the door and hinges with the same media that did the wheels. Decided this was way too aggressive and very coarse so they finished the top with soda blast.  Much nicer finish and won't need the filler that the coarse part needs. Since there is very little rust will use soda blast and take care of the rusty areas later. Charging $100/hr for soda blast. Will cost a little more than coarse blast but will have a better texture and won't have to fill. Appears to be easier to prep the soda blasted areas than the coarse blasted areas.Probably will bring the shell down for blasting shortly.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #29 on: July 29, 2014, 12:00:28 PM »
Got doors, bonnet, boot lid and license holder back yesterday. Pleased with result. Hinges on one door need rust removal but all the others just need a final light sanding. Blasting guy recommended wiping with vinegar to negate the alkaline soda but doesn't make sense to me. I use soda to negate acid such as vinegar but haven't heard of vice versa.
Billing dept wasn't there so they're going to bill me. Estimate about $200 maybe a little high ($100/hr). I'll use to estimate blasting shell. Looks like about $800 for shell inside and out.
But plan to soda blast the shell; basically don't look forward to hand stripping the shell.

Offline sparetimetoys

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #30 on: July 29, 2014, 12:10:28 PM »
The vinegar wash down is one of the big drawbacks to the soda blast. that and I was told by an independant body guy after soda blasting you still need to sand the car so the paint has something to grip onto.  He has seen nice paint jobs flake off in two years after soda blasting from failure to wash and prep. 
Home of Global Warmer Racing. Saving the smog one car at a time.

Online 94touring

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #31 on: July 29, 2014, 12:53:16 PM »
Wouldn't it make more sense to use an acid etch primer, followed by epoxy sealer,  rather than sand the entire body down?  I've done minor soda blasting and it seemed to have a slightly rough surface that would allow for adhesion, but if there's doubt perhaps acid etch would be the way to go.  In my case when I was done I used a metal prep on the airplane I was spraying to clean the surface.  Never heard of vinegar.

Offline racingflea

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #32 on: July 29, 2014, 10:57:38 PM »
ive got an extra riveted rim if you are interested. it does have some curb rash

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #33 on: July 30, 2014, 11:15:03 AM »
ive got an extra riveted rim if you are interested. it does have some curb rash
Thanks for the offer but I have four and not quite sure what to do with them other than possibly use for display. I'll use the welded ones for running as riveted ones I understand are suspect.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #34 on: July 30, 2014, 11:24:40 AM »
Wouldn't it make more sense to use an acid etch primer, followed by epoxy sealer,  rather than sand the entire body down?  I've done minor soda blasting and it seemed to have a slightly rough surface that would allow for adhesion, but if there's doubt perhaps acid etch would be the way to go.  In my case when I was done I used a metal prep on the airplane I was spraying to clean the surface.  Never heard of vinegar.

Acid etch primer was what I was thinking also. Should do the same job as vinegar (Acetic acid). Think I'll hit blasted areas anyway with sandpaper.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #35 on: July 30, 2014, 11:47:32 AM »
The vinegar wash down is one of the big drawbacks to the soda blast. that and I was told by an independant body guy after soda blasting you still need to sand the car so the paint has something to grip onto.  He has seen nice paint jobs flake off in two years after soda blasting from failure to wash and prep.
Just did a quick search on neutralizing soda on the chevelle forum. Sentiment is 95% against even if washed thoroughly.
Problem seems to be residue left from soda (alkaline) which must be rinsed. Then it seems to be a question if the surface then needs to be sanded to provide a decent mechanical texture to adhere to. Looked at other sand blasted areas and maybe I could go with this. Need to talk to my brother who has a blasting setup but compressor needs work.
 Re-thinking shell blast now.
ETA "against" 
« Last Edit: July 31, 2014, 11:24:43 AM by tsumini »

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #36 on: August 26, 2014, 11:17:35 AM »
Thought maybe I should make a little progress so I won't have to call my 60 year old car a 70 year old car.
Working on doors bonnet and boot. Had some filler to do and got them primered. Washed them with a mild acid and lightly sanded them. Insides as pouinted out before is rather PITA.
Also honed the clutch and brake Master cylinders and tested for leakage. Brake MC was not leaking staticly and sta for about a month. I put the brake MC on a shelf full to check if fluid leaked out the seals. Found some drops but they were on the soldered seam of the bean can. Confirmed seam leak by blowing air through the seam and seeing bubbles inside. 5 minute soldering job fixed it.
Through a MM forum I had found out that clutch MC had been installed backward and had interfered with the Brake MC  so that the brake MC had a dent and separated seam from the interference.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #37 on: August 26, 2014, 11:19:02 AM »
Incorrect Install

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #38 on: August 26, 2014, 11:19:58 AM »
Correct install. Notice gap between cylinders. and dented seam.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2014, 11:36:08 AM by tsumini »

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #39 on: September 29, 2014, 11:23:47 AM »
Finally after much procrastination and distractions got the shell soda blasted and primered. Still have to do some manual rust removal on floors and back deck and then primer.
Blasting showed up sheet metal flaws and minor dings. Top was kinda disappointing as there were three hand sized round bottom dents that wouldn't pop out.
I'm running out of time here and headed back to Texas in a couple of weeks so plan to paint the car next spring. Weather isn't very conducive to painting as it's rather cool until the afternoon and humidity is high. I grew up in these parts and have never seen this much rain. Raining this AM.
Went to an auction and endedn up with a mini aircleaner. Couldn't believe it was just lying on a heap of junk.

Offline sparetimetoys

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #40 on: September 29, 2014, 05:30:07 PM »
Cool deal on the air cleaner. Body looks nice
Home of Global Warmer Racing. Saving the smog one car at a time.

Offline Mudhen

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #41 on: September 29, 2014, 06:26:35 PM »
x2 - body looks great!!!   4.gif

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #42 on: September 30, 2014, 01:19:08 PM »
Little more rust inside than I expected but was cheap. If i don't screw up the decal it will be fine.

Offline herk

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #43 on: October 07, 2014, 10:45:15 PM »
body looks good, i'll be there Monday to help you with those dents , will need maybe an hour 4.gif    I will bring this thing and we will play after body work
what goes around comes around

Offline sparetimetoys

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #44 on: October 07, 2014, 11:29:55 PM »
Little more rust inside than I expected but was cheap. If i don't screw up the decal it will be fine.

If not that guy who I worked with sells the placard for like $10
Home of Global Warmer Racing. Saving the smog one car at a time.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #45 on: October 08, 2014, 11:00:09 AM »
Little more rust inside than I expected but was cheap. If i don't screw up the decal it will be fine.

If not that guy who I worked with sells the placard for like $10
Yeah I've got his details. Probably order one for the one I ruined.

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #46 on: November 20, 2014, 07:35:03 PM »
Little more progress after hauling some parts back to refurbish.
Since I was learning to weld didn't actually know how hard it was going to be. Couldn't seem to get a decent weld; blowing holes where I wanted weld; generally crappy job. Trie another weld a couple days ago and it was crappy. So decided to clean out all the dingleberries in the gun tip nozzle and it kinda disintegrated . Found wire blocking the CO2 gas. A couple of false starts like ordering wrong parts got it put back together and what a difference. Could actually make a nice shiny bead and plug welded several holes easily.

Online 94touring

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #47 on: November 21, 2014, 05:31:57 AM »
Dingleberries, never a good thing  :D

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #48 on: February 13, 2015, 10:08:36 PM »
Ok time to show a little progress. Two weeks to get over a cold and other obstructions.
Anyway the car is missing the gas tank so I hastily bought a tank with sending unit but it was the later unit that is a bayonette fit into the tank and require a new guage and voltage stabilizer. Since I wanted to stay period correct some time last summer  I got  the earlier tank (along with a sending) with six mount screws on sending unit. The seller warned that it needed cleaning.  I looked into the tank and there are globs of brown crap all over and the inside coated with brown crust. I think someone tried to coat the inside for corrosion protection and just overdid it. So I found that the only thing that would cut it was acetone. So about one gallon of acetone and shaking with a few pounds of misc hardware it finally cleaned up and looked pretty decent with what looked like a galvanized inside. This is what it looked like halfway thru cleaning. I kinda botched the painting of the outside so needs re-painting.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 10:13:25 PM by tsumini »

Online tsumini

Re: 1960 Austin 850 Project
« Reply #49 on: February 13, 2015, 10:36:00 PM »
So I looked at the sending unit and it didn't look to healthy either> it seemed stuck and wouldn't rotate full to empty. Rather than force it and bend thins up I decide to take the sending unit apart. Since I had never seen one of these before and didn't even know how they came apart I decide to try anyway. It didn't work anyway so nothing to lose. Of course I took it apart the wrong way and succeeded in breaking the insulating piece that supports the electrical connecting post. In so doing that I haad to rebuild the broken piece and make anew post or transfer the old one to the new piece. I succeeded in transferring the old post but in doing so I worked the connecting wire to the core so that it fatigued and broke at the core. Since the wire was now short I had to unwind a turn from the coil to secure it again. The same crud was covering the inside of the sending unit and the pivot inside was frozen solid. I think I soaked it in Acetone for a bout a day and it cleaned up pretty well although I didn't get too aggressive as it seemed slightly fragile. Wire wheel with a dremel worked pretty good. Float pivot broke loose and after exercising it several times it loosened up to what I thought was good.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2015, 11:13:49 PM by tsumini »