Author Topic: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often  (Read 318 times)

Offline BruceK

Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« on: September 29, 2019, 09:34:14 AM »
Spotted this car at the All British show here in Austin this morning. 

Itís a Mini that has been fully converted to electric.   It started life as a Japanese Mini and now has a custom electric conversion by a company called Moment in Austin.    It uses custom front and rear subframeís and an Acura manual transmission.    From the outside it looks totally stock except for the absence of a tailpipe.   One battery packs sits in the box above the electric motor and transmission, and the second battery pack sits in the boot.  It can be shifted manually or just put in a gear and driven without ever shifting.

I think electric conversions like this is the future of a lot of old collector cars.

« Last Edit: September 29, 2019, 09:36:15 AM by BruceK »
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Online 94touring

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #1 on: September 29, 2019, 09:36:08 AM »

Offline BruceK

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #2 on: September 29, 2019, 09:46:05 AM »
Its freaky when it moves because it is of course completely silent.
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline Miniac

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #3 on: September 29, 2019, 10:37:23 AM »
I wonder how much money and how fast!  Very cool!
1990 Rover Mini black

Offline BruceK

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #4 on: September 29, 2019, 10:52:17 AM »
I was told it is very fast.  Price was not disclosed.   Range is about 80 miles. But the car can be updated to newer, more powerful batteries as the tech develops.
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline jeff10049

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2019, 09:20:44 PM »
Interesting I'm all for electric cars and waiting for Mini of portland to get there test model of the new e Mini we are planning on buying one after a test drive if we like it.
But not so sure I'm into the converting old cars takes away from the experience to me.

With the good state of tune most people keep their classics in and the relatively low miles they get driven compared to other cars they don't pose much environmental risk if a person was concerned about that so why change it? Internal combustion engines are fascinating all the parts needed, the sounds, operating them, the modifications that can be done like forced induction everything about it really.

Golf carts on steroids not so much.  So you spend a lot of money to make your classic mini into a tesla only not as fast, safe, quiet, or with any amount of range. granted it looks cooler but is that enough of a trade-off?  People might say yeah it's still a classic.
 sure in looks but the rest is not If I wanted to drive a modern car id just get in one and go like I do most days my classics are for a fun and different driving experience.

I'm sure the electric also give a fun and different experience but removes the history from the car that is one of the most important aspects to me if we are only preserving the body of the car I feel like why bother.

I still think it's neat I just don't get it I was however given a morris minor that doesn't run maybe a candidate for electric if I could just wrap my head around the idea. I dunno one hand the sound of the engine and twin carbs grabbing the gears shifting is fun.

 On the other hand, lots of instant power/torque it is probably quieter I like that. It would still be fun takes less maintenance (but who really cares on a classic that can actually be part of the fun of ownership) cost to do it with any driving range is very expensive car will weigh more HVAC system can be complicated and expensive. How hard is it on batteries to sit? most classics are not driven every day and a battery replacement can rival the cost of an engine for a classic. An engine is almost never worn out once redone for the average classic owner. So much to consider I may start looking into the options just for something different maybe thats why anybody does it.

Jeff



Offline gr8kornholio

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #6 on: September 30, 2019, 08:03:43 AM »
My biggest problem with electric is still the range and with this I'd guess even Bruce would have to stop for a charge before he reached austin.  From DFW it'd probably take 2. 

On the cost aspect that's an each his own thing.  If y'all missed it an Integra type R just went for $72K on BaT.  Enjoy your honda paper weight. 
I am the GR8KORNHOLIO! Are you threatening me?

Saussie Aussie 1965 Australian MK1 Mini.
"Beavis" - 07 MY/MY MCS, B/MY Konig Daylites, JCW sideskirts, TSW springs, TSW lower rear control arms -- Exploring the country with new friends since 11/09.

Offline jeff10049

Re: Hereís a restoration/modification you donít see too often
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2019, 12:59:07 AM »
yup, I figured out to get any real range and serious performance out of a conversion id be out $30k for the drive train and still not have a great charging system or battery balance system or or or....... but for say $15k you could build a pretty good gas car drive train.
 It's amazing to me that you can buy a model 3 tesla for around 40k its like getting the car for free you're buying the drivetrain.