Author Topic: That's Why They're Called Adjustable  (Read 290 times)

Offline Rosebud

That's Why They're Called Adjustable
« on: May 10, 2018, 01:53:13 AM »
I was following the manufacture's recommendation to start with a setting of half-way between soft & firm for my GAZ shocks. I saw on another forum that most folks were running a much softer setting so I thought I'd do some experimenting. I backed way off on the adjustment knobs and it made a huge difference. You can read more on my FB blog if you'd like...


https://www.facebook.com/notes/poser-motorsports/thats-why-theyre-called-adjustable/1939549512784382/
Rosebud
...the sled, not the flower
https://www.facebook.com/PoserMotorSports

Online MiniDave

Re: That's Why They're Called Adjustable
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2018, 07:22:27 AM »
I was running ProTech coil overs on my car and had them set at "4", soft is good  for street use, you only need to stiffen them up if you're going to run a track event or get crazy on the dragon.....
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline Rosebud

Re: That's Why They're Called Adjustable
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2018, 11:53:58 AM »
...you only need to stiffen them up if you're going to run a track event or get crazy on the dragon.....


I guess that would be my next question. If the surface of the event is smooth, it seems counterintuitive to stiffen the shocks. Other than dampening body roll, what's the advantage of stiff shocks on a smooth surface?
Rosebud
...the sled, not the flower
https://www.facebook.com/PoserMotorSports

Online 94touring

Re: That's Why They're Called Adjustable
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2018, 12:04:27 PM »
When it comes to dampening of a vehicle the goal is to reduce body roll, which in turn effects weight transfer.  Too soft and weight shift in the form of roll will decrease handling.  Too stiff however will also decrease handling.  Some roll is desired to plant weight into the tires.  You need downward force to make things stick to the road.  There is a happy balance in reducing lateral weight and maintaining downward weight.  In a rear wheel drive car for example you'd ideally make the rear softer than the front, so when you punch the gas, the body sits down on the rear and the tires will grip, instead of spinning.  It's all a balancing act.  Plus for a road car too stiff is brutal, even for spirited weekend toy.  I always kept my gaz a few clicks in from soft. Anything past 6 or 7 and the car would bounce on the cones, which is horrible feeling but also not good for consistant road holding.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2018, 12:14:04 PM by 94touring »