Author Topic: Lone Star Mini Restoration  (Read 34746 times)

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #50 on: September 16, 2017, 11:20:11 PM »
I recommend you buy a factory harness, then add an extra fuse box and make up the harness for the extra lights and such.....that's how I do it.

I run a main power wire fused for 30 amps up to the aux fuse panel, then run my light wires from there.....I also use relays for my aux lights.

In this pic you can see the aux fuse box and light relays on the left of the engine compartment.
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline 94touring

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #51 on: September 16, 2017, 11:29:15 PM »
There are cotter pins to remove from the pedals to free the masters.

Speedo cable or throttle cable?  Because the speedo cable looks removed to me, but throttle cable still in place. It yanks out of the bulkhead once freed from the pedal.

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #52 on: September 17, 2017, 07:59:44 AM »
MiniDave..  Your recommendation will be taken on the wiring harness, thank you.  Love your engine bay.. everything looks so pristine.  Your engine looks a bit different, if I may ask.  What are the components that I'm pointing to?  Also, it looks as though your Mini is still R/H drive.. is that the case?   In addition, what is the component just to the left of the #2 question (has a line running up/down)
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #53 on: September 17, 2017, 08:31:21 AM »
This was my last Mini, Buzz. My current car is LHD. Buzz lives in Kilgore Texas and his owner Justin went on our last run to San Antonio Hill country this past March. Thread here.... http://restorationmini.com/forum/index.php?topic=1154.0

The item on the left is a remote brake booster (power brakes) and those are available as a kit that will work on almost any Mini, they're about $250.

The item on the right up close to the windshield is the wiper motor.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2017, 08:35:12 AM by MiniDave »
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #54 on: September 17, 2017, 10:44:40 AM »
This was my last Mini, Buzz. My current car is LHD. Buzz lives in Kilgore Texas and his owner Justin went on our last run to San Antonio Hill country this past March. Thread here.... http://restorationmini.com/forum/index.php?topic=1154.0

The item on the left is a remote brake booster (power brakes) and those are available as a kit that will work on almost any Mini, they're about $250.

The item on the right up close to the windshield is the wiper motor.

Ah.. the wiper motor appears to have a nice cover.  My metal wiper motor is all rusted.  I will have to learn about which brake system I want on my mini..  what exactly is a brake booster?  I'm sure it helps with better braking?
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #55 on: September 17, 2017, 10:46:47 AM »
This was my last Mini, Buzz. My current car is LHD. Buzz lives in Kilgore Texas and his owner Justin went on our last run to San Antonio Hill country this past March. Thread here.... http://restorationmini.com/forum/index.php?topic=1154.0



By they way.. totally look forward to an event/drive that I can join in.  I am going to the all British show this coming weekend..  at least we'll be there on Sunday.
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #56 on: September 17, 2017, 11:25:59 AM »
A brake booster simply amplifies the power from your right foot on the brake pedal -  IOW power brakes.

The booster uses vacuum from the intake to increase the brake pressure giving you more stopping power from the same pedal pressure.
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline 94touring

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #57 on: September 17, 2017, 01:38:42 PM »
I think I have a spare booster on my shelf for cheap just to clear space.

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #58 on: September 17, 2017, 02:10:37 PM »
I like having the booster - I've had it on both my cars - that said, when Don put the four pot MiniSport brake calipers on his Pup it actually was pretty easy to work the brakes....didn't take much leg at all, as compared to the Wilwoods he had on there before.

The only downside to me is that it takes up a lot of room in the engine compartment.
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #59 on: September 17, 2017, 03:38:30 PM »
a lot more parts to clean up today..  while perhaps the toughest job so far, I finally manage to removed both clutch and brake master cylinder (the pins that hold the rods to the pedals).  I then removed the steering column and all console brackets.  Afterwards I managed to work on the hubs and I believe the front sub-frame is nearly ready to be removed.  It's only 3:30 so I expect to get more done today (in between stops and starts helping my wife on other projects).  Definitely feel more intimate with my Mini after today!!! 
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #60 on: September 17, 2017, 03:41:00 PM »
I like having the booster - I've had it on both my cars - that said, when Don put the four pot MiniSport brake calipers on his Pup it actually was pretty easy to work the brakes....didn't take much leg at all, as compared to the Wilwoods he had on there before.

The only downside to me is that it takes up a lot of room in the engine compartment.

Thanks '94..'   I may take you up on the offer.  In fact, you are not terribly far from me.  Perhaps at some point I would like to come visit and hopefully learn a thing or two... 
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline 94touring

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #61 on: September 17, 2017, 04:32:03 PM »
Yeah come on up.  I always have something being built.  There's even a bed and living quarters if you want to stay!

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #62 on: September 18, 2017, 06:24:14 PM »
Gents I need a little help as I'm trying to go slow taking it easy w/o breaking anything.  My first time using the Sykes Pickavant tool for the cones.  Would someone please correct my thinking?   The way I understand it's use is as follows:
- The top 'handle threads the rod (Metric for >1976) into the female threads on top of the cone.
- The lower 'handle' then tightens the base sleeve causing the inner thread rod to pull the cone upward

I've now done this three times and each time I get to a point where I hear a loud 'POP' and the entire tool become loose from the cone.  Either my thinking is correct, I'm totally off base or perhaps the loud pop is the desired outcome.  I think what people are calling the 'trumpet' is below the cone.  Mine looks a little different than some 'hi-lows' I've seen.  I'm just slightly confused and I don't care to strip threads or break my tool.  I'm kind've proud of my first English tool...    Any insight?   I guess I'll go attempt to remove the lower arm from the sub-frame (this arm used to be attached to the hub).  Perhaps in doing so, something will present itself .. ???  Thanks in advance if anyone can offer advice.

Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline BruceK

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #63 on: September 18, 2017, 06:49:56 PM »
Gents I need a little help as I'm trying to go slow taking it easy w/o breaking anything.  My first time using the Sykes Pickavant tool for the cones.  Would someone please correct my thinking?   The way I understand it's use is as follows:
- The top 'handle threads the rod (Metric for >1976) into the female threads on top of the cone.
- The lower 'handle' then tightens the base sleeve causing the inner thread rod to pull the cone upward

Yes, your understanding of how it supposed to work is correct.  I would only add that the cone is compressed just enough to allow the trumpet to be removed.  Also, it's a good idea to lightly grease the point where the 'spinner' comes in contact with the top of tube.

I've now done this three times and each time I get to a point where I hear a loud 'POP' and the entire tool become loose from the cone.  Either my thinking is correct, I'm totally off base or perhaps the loud pop is the desired outcome.  I think what people are calling the 'trumpet' is below the cone.  Mine looks a little different than some 'hi-lows' I've seen.  I'm just slightly confused and I don't care to strip threads or break my tool.  I'm kind've proud of my first English tool...    Any insight?   I guess I'll go attempt to remove the lower arm from the sub-frame (this arm used to be attached to the hub).  Perhaps in doing so, something will present itself .. ???  Thanks in advance if anyone can offer advice.

There should be no pop at all.   The only time I've experienced a pop was when the captive nut broke out of the center of a very rusty cone on my old Mini from Canada. That was a complete mess to deal with.   

As for your pop, it sounds like the threads of the rod are not engaging in the cone threads -- or if they are then the cone threads are mostly stripped out and then suddenly releasing under pressue.   Is it possible you (or somebody before you) used the SAE threaded rod vs. the correct metric one? (or vice versa depending upon the age of your cones)

If you continue to be unable to compress the cone, you may have to work below to sacrifice and destroy the trumpet in order to release the trumpet/cone.   

BE CAREFUL please.  The front suspension is under a lot of tension (as you probably surmised by the loud pop of the tool).

Below is a photo I stole from the Interwebs showing, left to right, a Hi-Lo replacement trumpet, a regular Mini trumpet as fitted by the factory, and a rubber cone.   These are shown upside down from how they fit on the car.   Most people replace the original trumpets with the Hi-Lo oness because they are easier to work with and allow suspension height adjustment.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 07:02:32 PM by BruceK »
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #64 on: September 18, 2017, 07:04:27 PM »
You don't need to remove the cones to take the subframe out, I would remove the subframe and then disassemble it. The hardest part of removing the cones is to remove the upper control arm thru rods, but with the subframe out it's easy peasy. Of course, with the engine out it's a lot easier too.

I'm told it only takes 7 turns of the tool to compress the cone to it's maximum amount. Your goal is only to compress the spring far enough to get the trumpet or high low out.....but the cone won't come out of the subframe until the upper control arm is out too.

Take a pic of the trumpet for us? If you have adjustable trumpets (high lows) then you need to adjust it all the way down too.

Referring to Bruce's pic, that ball on the end of the trumpet will stick in the control arm too, and it can pop when it comes out. From a couple of the pics it looks like you have standard trumpets, not high lows, but a pic up close will let us know for sure.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 07:10:23 PM by MiniDave »
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #65 on: September 18, 2017, 07:34:11 PM »
Thanks gents. Of the three items in the picture, mine looks like the middle one. I will take a pic when I return home
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline MiniDave

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #66 on: September 18, 2017, 07:46:49 PM »
You need to remove the upper control arm, then it will all come apart easily.......

« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 07:49:05 PM by MiniDave »
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline 94touring

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #67 on: September 18, 2017, 08:02:20 PM »
The pops are when the threads give out. You probably have different threads than your tool.  Also like has been said, drop the subframe then remove.  Easier with it out and the upper arm's removed so they fall out.

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #68 on: September 18, 2017, 08:12:02 PM »
You guys are awesome!!  I greatly appreciate your help/input.  I'm thinking that perhaps I have used the wrong rod (not sure which is metric and standard).  Thought I was using the metric, but maybe I'm wrong.

As you said MiniDave, it appears that mine are the standard trumpets and what a tip. I will definitely drop the frame first as I thought I had to have everything removed (still have the steering rack in too).
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #69 on: September 18, 2017, 08:12:46 PM »
The pops are when the threads give out. You probably have different threads than your tool.  Also like has been said, drop the subframe then remove.  Easier with it out and the upper arm's removed so they fall out.

What a GREAT cross section image.. thank you for that!!!
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #70 on: September 18, 2017, 08:25:16 PM »
While I'm asking, I have another question that is near embarrassing.  I've tried to remove the headlight bowls, but I broke (no kidding) two screw driver tips in doing so.  these four screws appear whimpy, but good Lord my impact driver won't budge them.  I've looked inside and can't feel anything whatsoever (like a nut or other).  I thought I would wait until I had the shell on the rotisserie, but I will attempt again.  I've seen other bowls riveted on and people had to drill them out, but mine are not rivets.. ???  Any tips? 
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline BruceK

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #71 on: September 18, 2017, 10:26:58 PM »
They should just be regular screws but likely rusted in place.     If it was me, I drill them out/cut them off.    You're probably want to replace the headlight buckets anyway with plastic ones - they will never rust and they are quite reasonably priced if you get them from right supplier.    Last time I bought some I think Victoria British had the best price. 
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #72 on: September 19, 2017, 06:19:40 AM »
Thanks Bruce..  I will attempt to cut them off then.  I sprayed DP Blaster a couple times thinking it would help, but those dudes are tight.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2017, 07:21:19 AM by Lone Star Mini »
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Lone Star Mini

Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #73 on: September 19, 2017, 07:04:27 PM »
Little effort to remove the 'arms' just below the trumpet.  Hopefully this will help me remove the trumpet and cones w/o that added pressure.  I'm going back at now...
Lone Star Mini
1982 Morris Mini 1000HL (heck of a lot of work ahead of me)
1992(?) Mini Cooper
1964 Austin Cooper

Offline Willie_B

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Re: Lone Star Mini Restoration
« Reply #74 on: September 19, 2017, 07:52:57 PM »
Just so you know, the pivot shaft should not look like that.