Author Topic: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM  (Read 10540 times)

Offline bryanp

Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« on: May 12, 2016, 03:57:32 PM »
Hello all; I bought this Mini 1000 last month.  The previous two owners endured the pain and suffering of doing all the metal and paint.  The seller had too many projects and quickly reinstalled the original interior and 1000 drivetrain so he could market it as a runner.  He also installed all of the new goodies he purchased - new HS4, alternator, coil, wheels and flares. 

So the car is currently a weird combination of really nice next to really ratty.  I live in Santa Fe, NM which is beautiful, but hard on the horsepower since SF is at 7,000' elevation and my house is at 7,700'.   The guys at Minimania put me in touch w/ Joe Curto who sent me an AAP needle which, along with adjusting the mixture, has cured my extreme rich running.  I also tried to time the motor, but discovered that the really gross distributor probably has its original, and completely cratered, points.  I will install the new electronic ignition car this weekend.  Would an original Mini 1000 have had an external ballast?  If so, I am not seeing it.       

The projects;
I am replacing the seats now (see pic).  I am installing a set of Corbeau Classic II buckets.  One is in using the Corbeau base for the Mini (which still required some beating).  I am doing a hinge arrangement on the other for back seat access.  Also adding tach.

This winter I will re-do the suspension, install 8.4 discs, and add sway bars.  If there is money left, add dynamat, replace the brown carpet w/ gray, new back seat, door cards, etc. 

The next winter, I will replace the 998cc's of fury w/ a 1380A+ unit.  since I am dealing with altitude, my plan is to get one of the Eaton supercharger/intake manifold kits from the UK to cram as much air as I can into the engine.   I have read that it is probably advisable to change the final drive when going that route.

I am glad I found this site; I had posted my HS4 needle issue on the northamericanmotoring site, but this place seems to have a lot more classic Mini-specific traffic.  My Dad had two Mark Is when I was growing up.  He also raced a Moke in the PA Hillclimb Series in the 1970s - a scary looking Moke.  He is obviously extremely helpful, but gives me a hard time about owning "one of those new Minis from the 70s."

Pics; first, how it showed up in Santa Fe (it's the blue one).
<br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br /><br />       

Offline 94touring

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #1 on: May 12, 2016, 04:51:46 PM »
Welcome  4.gif. That blue is similar to Mexico blue.  Nice color choice.   Hs4 is a lot of carb for a 998 especially at altitude!

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2016, 05:10:16 PM »
Welcome, I was one of the people on NAM who replied to you, nice looking Mini!
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline jedduh01

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2016, 09:41:50 AM »
Nice little buggy - !  as you said the Tough Stuff is DONE!!


  Just a pointer -- as they look great - and fit well to the current package  - your wheel set  is pretty much like dropping anchor on your little 998. also depending on your gearing....

Simple facts of the weight + diameter and width creating more drag of that 13' wheel set you are lugging around more wheel than intended.  Totally not the end of the world - and if you' are planning a powerplant upgrade you will be good to go!!! 

If you had a nice set of Smaller 12's  or even a proper set of 10 Wheels the 998 would cope much better with the reduced mass to spin around.

Goodluck with the build and progress- keep us updated!

 

Offline SoCalMiniFan

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2016, 01:11:45 PM »
If my '74 1000 only had a body half as nice as yours! 

That's going to be a great little ride when all is said and done. 

Great pick up.

On a side note, quickly looking at the images I thought the hearse was towing the Mini!
"If it's not fun, why do it?"

Offline bryanp

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2016, 05:38:25 PM »
It looked to me like they could have just stuffed the Mini into the back of the hearse, give or take an inch!

You point is well taken re: the 13" fat wheels I got from the seller.  It also came with five original 10" wheels w/ rubber so old, they don't even have date codes, and I can see my reflection in the sidewalls . . . .  Since I am hopefully within 16 months of having a new motor, I will probably hold off for now.

I will report back on installing the electronic ignition this weekend.

A few pics of my Dad's old scary Moke circa 1974;
« Last Edit: May 13, 2016, 05:40:38 PM by bryanp »

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2016, 07:07:47 PM »
Wow, I really like how he used the fenders for a spoiler! Holy downforce Batman!   ;D

Was this for autocross or a track car?
« Last Edit: May 13, 2016, 07:09:18 PM by MiniDave »
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline John Gervais

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Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2016, 08:33:42 PM »
Hello all; I bought this Mini 1000 last month.  The previous two owners endured the pain and suffering of doing all the metal and paint.  The seller had too many projects and quickly reinstalled the original interior and 1000 drivetrain so he could market it as a runner.  He also installed all of the new goodies he purchased - new HS4, alternator, coil, wheels and flares. 

So the car is currently a weird combination of really nice next to really ratty.  I live in Santa Fe, NM which is beautiful, but hard on the horsepower since SF is at 7,000' elevation and my house is at 7,700'.   The guys at Minimania put me in touch w/ Joe Curto who sent me an AAP needle which, along with adjusting the mixture, has cured my extreme rich running.  I also tried to time the motor, but discovered that the really gross distributor probably has its original, and completely cratered, points.  I will install the new electronic ignition car this weekend.  Would an original Mini 1000 have had an external ballast?  If so, I am not seeing it.       

This winter I will re-do the suspension, install 8.4 discs, and add sway bars.  If there is money left, add dynamat, replace the brown carpet w/ gray, new back seat, door cards, etc. 

The next winter, I will replace the 998cc's of fury w/ a 1380A+ unit.  since I am dealing with altitude, my plan is to get one of the Eaton supercharger/intake manifold kits from the UK to cram as much air as I can into the engine.   I have read that it is probably advisable to change the final drive when going that route.
     

Ok, first, congratulations and welcome!  Nice color on it too!

My o'pinion:

If you're going with 8.4" disks later on, you'll really want the 12" wheels, as 13" is too heavy for any practical use, even with the supercharger.     12" is where it's at - and a '60' profile tire (ex. Yokohama A539 165/60/12) will give a bit more comfort and last way longer than the 165/55/12 Yoko A048.  EBC makes some fantastic dimpled and slotted 8.4" disks, greenstuff pads and you'll stop.  No servo required, but make sure you use the proper rear cylinders.

I'll also try to talk you out of the 1380 - that's the largest practical overbore, and if something goes sour, you're looking for a new block (or sleeving it).  I'd go with a 1275 +0.20" to give 1293cc - you'll get plenty of grunt and if you need to do something later on, still have +0.40" or 0.60" or even 0.080" left in it.  1275 blocks are getting scarce, and there are a lot of guys with 1380's that are running out of luck (and still only have warm 1275 performance). 

That said, a hot 998 can also be an absolute blast, and more robust than the 1275.  Yeah, I'm partial to the 998, I've got one of them...  My spare 998 engine will soon be fitted with + 0.020" or 0.040" 1098 pistons on the 998 crankshaft - just need a light skim on the block surface to bring the CR back up.  Should be a torque monster!  Oh, I also need more money to make something happen...

The HS4 isn't a whole lot o'carb for the 998, my original 850 was 'born with' an HS4 from the factory, as were many 850's - Chilean export model 850's received HIF38's from the factory also.  Marvelous carbs...  998's love the HS4 - they like the HIF38 even better, or twin HS2's even more!  Woohoo!

I later fitted twin HS2's to my 850, along with a lightweight flywheel and a few other goodies - ran like a scalded cat, limiting factor on most minis is the gearing.  I can't remember what that gearbox had, believe it was 3.647 or maybe 3.765:1.  I'm now using 3.44:1 on my warmed-up 998, and it still feels like it runs out of gears - loud as hell in the cabin at 5500 rpm (95mph), but still pulling.  I guess if I had the 'nads, I could bring it up to 6500 or 6800 before I should be thinking of the valvetrain, but I don't want to test the aerodynamics at 110+.  A 3.2:1 FD would ease things up a bit, 5100 rpm would be about 95mph.  Slightly less noise.

Dynamat?  Really?  (why???)  Might as well add a sandbag too... 

The rear sway bar is really all you need.  Heavy-duty adjustable tie rods in front with the hard/soft bush combination, extra engine steadies, negative camber lower arms with corrected bushings, rear camber brackets and toe shims.

Edit:

Ah, the ballast resistor.  Some minis, had a ballast resistor wire (cable) instead of the usual ceramic block.  My Haynes manual shows the Pre-1977 Canadian market 1000cc mini having a White ballast resistor cable (wire) sharing the coil + terminal with a White w/Blue trace wire.  1977 onwards Canadian 1000cc minis used a White w/Pink trace resistor cable on the coil +.  All 1984 onwards carburetor models (both single and multiple instrument pack) also had a ballast cable (White w/Pink) on the coil + terminal.  1988 onward carburetor models also had a ballast resistor cable, this time it changed to Pink w/White trace on the coil +.

I installed a ballast resistor (ceramic block) when I installed the optical ignition.  Makes good sense.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2016, 09:02:01 PM by John Gervais »
- Pave the Bay -

Offline bryanp

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #8 on: October 09, 2016, 03:38:01 PM »
Hi All - it has been a while since I posted re: the blue car; although it was driveable when I received it, the drivetrain was clearly tossed back in in a hurry - SU w/ no oil in it, more than several nuts/bolts only finger-tight, etc.   I had a fun summer driving it - very fun car to toss around, but just miserably underpowered given the altitude and the hilly nature of Santa Fe. 

I replaced the rear shocks - appeared to be original and probably shot decades ago -  w/ Spax adjustables - and installed a KAD sway bar.  The rear subframe is brand new, with some new undercoating unfortunately slathered on  in a few spots.  what appeared to be brand new adjustable Hi/Los had been installed -so I just adjusted them - and the radius arms had been removed, cleaned and painted.   

I installed the Corbeau II seats as well as the steering column lowering bracket from DSN Classics and new steering wheel. 

I have had interesting engine discussions w/ folks in the UK - per John G's advice, I am having a 1293 A+ motor built for me by the same guy that is providing the Eaton supercharger.  The consensus is that "1380" and "supercharger" should never go in the same sentence.  As it is, the center main bearing attachment will be enhanced as if it were a race motor. 

I hope to have the motor/gearbox (the 5-speed w/ x-pin diff from MiniSpares)/supercharger package by January.  Since it's staring to get cold here, I will go ahead and pull the 998 (anyone want it? it seems to run great), re-do the front suspension w/ the MiniSport discs, coilover shocks, the heavy-duty adjustable tie rods, put in a new interior, and convert to LHD.  the steering transition should be easy, but the pedals/master cylinders will be a trick.  The supercharger set-up appears to take up space exactly where the master cylinders would be if I moved them to the left side.  I am looking at a pedal box w/attached cylinders and remote reservoirs like this one = http://www.obpltd.com/Pedal-Boxes/Classic-Mini/Classic-Mini-Pedal-Box-Hydraulic-Clutch-OBP0304  I'd be interested in other's thoughts on how to achieve this.  If I were the only person to drive it, I might leave it RHD, but I would like for my wife and eventually my sons to drive it - and I'd rather it be LHD for them as well.

Enjoy!

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #9 on: October 09, 2016, 03:55:23 PM »
5 speed! You ARE spending some scheckels!

What final drive will you have? I have a 3.44:1 in mine and like John says, it's pretty low gears. I'm in 2nd or even third by the time I get across a wide intersection....I'm changing to a 3:1 this winter. With the 5th gear you can run those lower final drive gears and keep the low speed acceleration.  I think the MS 5 speed comes with a 3.44.......with a supercharger you'll have plenty of low down grunt so you could run a taller FD.....

It will be fun to see this come together.....check with MiniTec - they use a Wilwood pedal set and master cylinders for their Vtec conversions that looks very similar to the one you linked. http://superfastminis.com/WILRACEPEDALKIT.htm
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline John Gervais

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Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #10 on: October 09, 2016, 05:08:26 PM »
Cool!   77.gif
- Pave the Bay -

Offline bryanp

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2016, 05:49:38 PM »
thanks, Dave - I had looked at some Wilwood pedal boxes, but hadn't seen the Mini-specific product.  Here are the specs on the Mini spares 5-speed;
"It is fitted with a closer ratio gear set than the standard 4 speed gearbox by virtue of a redesigned laygear and first motion shaft which produce the following ratios-

1st gear 3.282

2nd gear 1.966

3rd gear 1.283

4th gear 1-1

5th gear is technically an overdrive gear and produces a reduction of .882 on the helical teeth gearbox with a new 3.444 final drive it gives a 5th gear ratio of 3.037."

It is definitely more expensive than I normally would have gone but (1)  both our Interstates in NM are 75mph, so I definitely want some long legs on it, and (2) I did very well when I sold my Alfa Giulia SS last year, so I'm not blowing any budgets yet.  Plus, Mini stuff from the UK suppliers has been a total bargain since Brexit!

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #12 on: October 09, 2016, 07:41:10 PM »
I know, I've been buying all my stuff at Mini Spares and Sport this year.....did you sell your Alfa on BaT?
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline John Gervais

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Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #13 on: October 09, 2016, 07:53:08 PM »
There are many advantages to buying at MiniSpares, namely that they're the ones who actually manufacturer/find suppliers for many discontinued parts and are primary suppliers to MM and the like.  Oftentimes you'll have a far greater selection of critical bits and oftentimes get much needed parts quicker by ordering direct from the UK vs. waiting for stateside suppliers to receive stock from the UK.

I've only bought from MiniSport a few times, so I can't really comment on their performance, but I've a MiniSpares sticker on my wall cabinet.
- Pave the Bay -

Offline BruceK

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #14 on: October 09, 2016, 10:20:12 PM »
All the Brexit has done is nicely sweeten what was already fantastic pricing from UK suppliers - especially MiniSpares, as compared to the US-based Mini parts houses.     

Traditionally, MiniSpares prices were just one-half of the prices of MiniMania and Seven for the exact same part.

Or in other words, both MiniMania and Seven typically have a 100% markup on the retail prices -- not wholesale prices (!) -- of what MiniSpares charges.     (and just consider they buy inventory in bulk and certainly don't pay retail when they do)

So with the pound falling against the dollar to around $1.26 = 1 things are even better.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2016, 10:44:25 PM by BruceK »
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline bryanp

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #15 on: December 04, 2016, 12:04:12 PM »
Slow progress continues (since my projects never go fast).   Since my last posting, the engine is out, the interior is out, the front suspension out, cleaned, powder coated and reinstalled - I won't reinstall the hubs until after the new engine/gearbox is in.  DHL managed to lose the new 5-speed box from MiniSpares - it was last scanned in LA on 11/23.  Hopefully it will turn up soon, otherwise I am looking at another 12 week lead time since MiniSpares makes them as they are ordered.  :-[    Not really a big deal since it's not like I would be driving it up here in the Rockies in February/March anyway. . . .  the engine & supercharger should be here the end of January.  The final formula on that is 1312 ccs w/ other enhancements

I got the pedal box from OBP whereby the master cylinders will be inside, and I can mount the reservoirs in the engine bay, away from the supercharger and exhaust manifold heat. 

The driver's side window operation is unhappy, and the glass is scratched, so I'll tackle that next.  Why did Mini seal the door regulator cover as if there may be a hurricane on the other side?  There are three other openings on the inside sheet metal just inches away . . .  I have new glass and the inside & outside trim felt/rubber finishing strips (and the clips). 

Any ideas on selling the old 998 unit (other than ebay)?  Other than a new water pump and new carb, it looks to me like it may be original and never opened.  I have no idea on mileage.  Now that I think about it, I should have done a compression test before pulling it out, but I also can't imagine that anyone would be dumping it in a car as-is. 

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #16 on: December 04, 2016, 01:25:46 PM »
Are those the 1 1/2 negative camber lower arms? If so, did you get the offset bushings to go with them?

How was the gearbox on the 998?

The starter is still on it, hook a battery up to it and test the compression....be good to know what it is. Be sure the oil pressure switch is still in it, don't want to squirt oil all over the shop!  ;D
« Last Edit: December 04, 2016, 01:29:30 PM by MiniDave »
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline MPlayle

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2016, 02:03:13 PM »
Any idea what the final drive is?  What is the shifter?  Does the distributor come with it?

If the paperwork on my Moke finally gets here this next week, I may consider it as an eventual upgrade to the Moke's 850 when I start the major restoration on it.


Offline bryanp

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #18 on: December 05, 2016, 10:51:10 AM »
MiniDave - the lower arms are stock; I had to do a little grinding (evident in the one picture) since the fork on the new adjustable tie-rods was a little tight.
I thought the gearbox was very smooth, no grinding.  Third gear was a little hard to find until I got the hang of it - it could have also been my inexperience driving a RHD car.
I will do a compression test this week and post the results.

MPlayle - the  gearbox is the Rod type (the car is a 74) and since I am assuming it is the original unit, I believe it would have the 3.44 final drive.  Yes, the original distributor would come with it (you would have to give it new points - they are pretty pitted). The carb, water pump and mechanical fuel pump all appear to be new and would be sold w/ the engine.   

Offline BruceK

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #19 on: December 05, 2016, 12:02:14 PM »
Grinding on the lower arms?  Never heard of that being needed before. 

Edit: Okay, now I see the photo.  Never mind.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2016, 12:05:34 PM by BruceK »
1988 Austin Mini
2002 MINI Cooper S
2007 Triumph Bonneville

Offline tmsmini

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2016, 12:07:38 PM »
With all that you are putting into this, I would add adjustable lower arms, so you can dial in the suspension to match the rest.
And I would also add rear camber/toe brackets as well.
Terry

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2016, 01:18:42 PM »
Yep, I agree about the adjustable arms and rear camber brackets - I prefer they type that KAD or Mini Sport sell.
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline MPlayle

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #22 on: December 05, 2016, 02:53:58 PM »
Another odd question: Is the differential output pot joint or yoke style?

Offline MiniDave

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #23 on: December 05, 2016, 03:45:40 PM »
He says it's rod change so it should be pot joints, right?
1989 Cooper Racing Green
2009 Clubman S
1969 Jaguar XK-E FHC
2004 Audi Allroad 2.7 TT

Offline MPlayle

Re: Introduction - '74 Mini 1000, Blue Thunder in NM
« Reply #24 on: December 05, 2016, 03:53:32 PM »
Dave,

I believe you are correct that it should be pot joint outputs.  I can't remember the cut-over years for the transitions and whether there may have been rod-change with yoke or magic-wand with pot-joint setups.

I'm trying to picture ahead for planning the restoration of the Moke and what would readily adapt and what may require significantly more effort.